Upholstery Life

Upholstery Life

Historically

The earliest upholsterers, from early Egyptian times to the beginning of the Renaissance, nailed animal skins or dressed leather across a rigid framework. They slowly developed the craft to include cushions, padding, and pillows—stuffed with such materials as goose down and horsehair. Today we use modern materials such as polyurethane foam and cotton or polyester batting. For Over 4 generations now our family has been serving Volusia County. 

The U.S. textile industry, its domestic suppliers and customers are composed of the following: the textile industry; suppliers in the cotton, wool, and man-made fiber sectors; the U.S. textile machinery and textile chemical industries; and our customers in the U.S. apparel industry. 

The U.S. textile industry, its domestic suppliers and customers are composed of the following: the textile industry; suppliers in the cotton, wool, and man-made fiber sectors; the U.S. textile machinery and textile chemical industries; and our customers in the U.S. apparel industry.  

As a brief overview, the Industry is made-up of: 

  • Those who produce the raw materials used in fabrics, the fiber producers; 
  • Those who make the fabric - knitting mills and weavers; 
  • Those who dye and finish the fabric - dyers and finishers; 
  • Those who design the garments or products - designers; 
  • Those who cut and sew the fabric - contractors; 
  • Those who manufacturer the finished products - manufacturers; and, 
  • Those who sell the products - retailers. 

Currently 

The U.S. textile industry, suppliers and our customers are an important component of the U.S. economy and are found in every region of the country.  The industry provides much needed jobs in rural areas and has functioned as a springboard for workers out of poverty into good paying jobs for generations.  The industry is also a key contributor to our national defense and supplies over 8,000 products a year to our men and women in uniform (American Textile).  

Over the past 30 years, the industry has become a major factor in hi-tech innovation.  Textile products are now major components in everything from heart valves and stents to aircraft bodies and advanced body armor.  In fact, in 2010 the textile sector alone contributed $26.3 billion to the U.S. Gross Domestic Product.  The U.S. textile industry consumed nearly 1.7 billion pounds of U.S. grown cotton in 2011 (American Textile).

The combined U.S. textile industry -- including cotton and man-made fiber producers, textile mills, apparel plants and textile machinery producers -- is a large employer in the United States. Currently there are over 500,000 workers employed by the industry. The breakdown in 2011 is textile mills 121,000; textile product mills 117,000; apparel 152,000; and cotton 116,275 (American Textile).

The U.S. textile industry invested $16.5 billion from 2001-2010. This has allowed the U.S. industry to increase productivity gains that have surpassed all other sectors.  Investments will be crucial for the global competitiveness of the U.S. industry. The U.S. textile industry is export intensive, and is currently the third largest textile exporter in the world. With most textile manufacturing plants operating overseas, the U.S. textile industry is expected to become the leading exporter among all industries. (American Textile).